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444 Marlin Vs. 45-70 – Which Is Better & Suitable?

When the hunting season starts, you need to be prepared with the best. Although the U.S. military can’t think of any other cartridge than 5.56′, some old but famous bullets are still available for hunting. Our today’s topic is about 444 Marlin vs. 45-70.

Let’s look at these excellent loads of good and bad points side by side so that you can choose one because a good hunt is measured from the first move.

444 Marlin Vs. 45-70

Things To Look At .444 Marlin

Things To Look At .444 Marlin

Marlin’s decision to choose the .44 Magnum as a basic for the big bore rifle cartridge and cartridge combination. The cartridge case was lengthened in collaboration with Remington, expanding the cartridge’s case capacity significantly.

As a result, the .444 has a small but dedicated following big bore shooters and it is a unique cartridge that always generates discussion.

Performance

Performance

The .444 has a fine reputation for producing mild recoil. If a 240-grain bullet is fired at about 2350 to 2450fps, recoil is similar to the .35 Whelen.

.444 Marlin cartridges can fire fast-expanding 240-grain projectiles at 2450 feet per second and produce hydrostatic shocks down to impact speeds of around 2100 feet per second (about 90 yards).

Generally, the .444 cartridge has a dramatic, fast killing ability. Although such mechanisms should never be relied upon exclusively due to the many variables that can influence the results, it is still great to have a cartridge that can perform such well.

However, even with those drawbacks, the .444 offers impressive hydraulic power at close range, resulting in extensive, quick bleeding wounds inside the target.

Even though vast internal wounding can theoretically be achieved with a .444 out to 330 yards, it is not practical to use this cartridge at such a long distance.

A .444 accurate rifle will produce great results at 200 yards and beyond. When loaded with 240-grain bullets, the .444 does well on deer that are lighter in body weight.

The 240-grain weight maintains the balance of all factors even though conventional cup and core projectiles shed a lot of weight at close ranges, and or they show delayed kills (dead runs) on smaller targets when fired at moderate distances.

Factory Ammunition

Factory Ammunition

There is still a Remington load for the .444, but limited production runs of this load are available now. It utilizes a 240-grain projectile whose muzzle velocity is 2350 fps. This projectile has a weak point to significantly improve penetration rather than the wide hollow end of the .44 Magnum.

With this projectile, a swift expansion is generated (also due to excellent lead exposure), and a reasonably decent penetration is achieved. This load performs well on light to mid-weight deer species over reasonable ranges.

The long-distance performance of the FTX (below 1600fps or beyond 200 yards) is sometimes somewhat limited because the thick skin can limit wounding potential. However, penetration is generally very good at such distances.

Hand Loading

Hand Loading

However, Hand loaders need to remember that leverevolution ammo brass is shorter than standard brass and measuring point 2.165’’ as opposed to 2.250’’ (including Hornady flat point ammunition).

Those using the 225 or 265-grain FTX projectile should use the 2.065 OAL, which is designed to fit the long rubber tip bullet.

Pros

  • Availability is excellent because of .44 Mag
  • The trajectory is speedy
  • Very exclusive, and very few get their hands on it.

Cons

  • Fits in very selective rifles and factory ammunition are also limited
  • Recoil is quite high
  • The only similarity with .44 Mag is bullet but uses a different powder.

Things To Look At .45-75 Govt

Things To Look At .45-75 Govt

 A few cartridges have endured such long-lasting popularity as the .45-70 U.S. Government. Originally designed as a military cartridge, it has become an ever-popular hunting cartridge 135 years later.

As early as 1836, designers presented an experimented task of breech loading firearms and self-contained cartridges through the world. While some inventors succeeded at making successful firearms, the muzzle loading percussion rifle won world supremacy until the beginning of the 1860s.

Performance

Performance

The .45-70 rating can be divided into three categories based on the strength of the actions utilized. The weakest rifle actions are the “trapdoor Springfields” and early lever actions.

Hand loaders should build low load pressures so that they can be safely used in these arms. Maximum pressure is often quoted as either 28000 CUP or 28000 PSI (related).This pressure (24’’ barrel) uses in factory loads to travel a 300 grain bullet at 1800 feet per second.

To get the second-level performance, you have to use a post-1972 Marlin 1895 rifle. The guide suggests a maximum of 40000 CUP or 45000 PSI pressure while reloading. Typically, the hand load consisted of a 300-grain bullet fired at 2400fps within 45,000 PSI.

One can also achieve extremely high pressures using rifles such as the Ruger No.1 or by using custom-built bolt actions. For a 300-grain bullet accelerated to 2530 feet per second, reloading guides recommend 50,000 CP or 60,000 PSI.

.45-70s can generate hydrostatic shock when armed with a fast expanding bullet with an impact velocity of around 2100fps. A .45-70 can deliver extraordinary wounding at close ranges due to its excellent hydraulic force and mechanical working.

Factory Ammunition

Factory Ammunition

Since all .45-70 cartridges produced by major US manufacturers are loaded to very safe pressures, they are particularly safe to use with antique firearms.

The three leading manufacturers of 300-grain Jacketed hollow-point loads produce them in sporting barrels 22 to 24 inches long and deliver an average speed of 1650-1700fps. Hornady’s most recent addition is 45-70 factory ammunition lineup which has a features of pointed bullet with a rubber tip.

Even with its pointed design, the FTX bullet does not have a flat trajectory since its BCs are no higher than similar round noses .45-70 bullets. In effect, FTX bullets offer no advantages over traditional factory bullet offerings and tend to offer identical wounding, speed of killing, and penetration.

Hand Loading

Hand Loading

As mentioned earlier, reloading manuals generally divide the .45-70 reloading data into three categories, the Trapdoor Springfield, contemporary lever action, and Ruger No.1 or bolt action custom rifles.

However, some hand loaders do well with slightly slower H322 powder. Many hand loaders find that H4198, IMR4198, and ADI2207 are among the best powders to use.

Pros

  • Various options for both factory load and bullet weight
  • Better Riffle Selection
  • Power is more than enough.

Cons

  • Rifles age and type must match with the load
  • Flat shooting is not the best
  • Few loads match full round capability.

444 Marlin VS 45-70 Gov – Which Is Better?

444 Marlin VS 45-70 Gov

I recommend either cartridge for medium and big game hunting in North America out to about 200 yards, or perhaps even farther if you are a great shooter.

In my opinion, the .45-70 Gov is a better hunting cartridge than the 444 Marlin, but the latter shoots flatter and is more accurate than the .45-70 on occasion. Ultimately, it’s up to you, but either one is fine.

The availability and cost of ammo should be taken into consideration when picking a rifle cartridge.

In general, 444 Marlin’s ammunition is more expensive and harder to find, at an average price of 35-50 cents more per round than 45-70 ammo, depending on the ammunition manufacturer.

Head To Head Comparison: 444 Marlin Vs. 45-70 Government

Head To Head Comparison: 444 Marlin Vs. 45-70 Government

The .444 Marlin has been a top choice for hunters and African safari seekers since its introduction in 1952.Even though it is nearly identical to the .45-70 Government, but that cartridge does not carry much factory loads which is available of these big-bore rounds.

On the other hand, 444 Marlin is relatively inexpensive to shoot. It is also popular with hunters who do not want a powerful cartridge that kicks like a mule.

Factory Loads

Loads

The 444 Marlin is available in many factory loads from Winchester, Remington, and Hornady. These loads are grouped into three categories based on bullet weight and velocity. The Lightweight load includes the 240gr LSW CHP and the 400gr Hornady SP.

The Standard load includes the 300gr Barnes XLC, 350gr Sierra HPBT, and 375gr Swift A-Frame. Lastly, the Heavyweight load is composed of both Nosler 385-390grain Partition bullet and 440 grain Barnes XPB.

Factory load bullet weights are not very powerful. The Lightweight loads have the highest velocity of 1025 ft/s, while the Heavyweight is at 930 ft/s. The Standard load has a modest 875 ft/s, but it does have higher velocities than the Heavyweight load.

45-70 VS 444 Marlin Ballistics Chart

45-70 VS 444 Marlin Ballistics Chart

 Bullet Weight

 Bullet Weight

The .45-70 is a full metal jacketed rounds. The 444 Marlin uses a copper-plated lead bullet. Both rounds weigh about the same at 174 grains, but that does not account for powder and bullet length differences. The .45-70 uses a longer and heavier round.

Ballistic Coefficient

Ballistic Coefficient

The .444 Marlin has a slightly higher BC than the .45-70, but it is still not considered to be very fast. The lightest factory load has an MV of 1025 ft /s. The Heavyweight load has an MV of 930 ft/s, which is a bit slower than the .45-70 at 950 ft/s.

The Power Factor

Both rounds have similar power factors. When compared to a standard .44 Magnums round, the .444 Marlin has a PF of around .73. Standard loads have a slightly higher power factor, at .76, but that does not consider how much heavier they are.

Handling

Handling

Both rounds have similar velocities and have been designed to be easily handled. The .45-70 has a slightly larger case, but it is still very manageable.

Accuracy

Both rounds are accurate at ranges between 25 and 200 yards. The 444 Marlin will outperform the .45-70 in close-range shots, but the .45-70 is a bit more accurate out to 200 yards.

Conclusion

I hope now you know about 444 Marlin Vs. 45-70 and which is best and suitable for you.

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